House on an Island – An Architectural Logic Puzzle

Island Home Concept – Modern Glass


I am currently designing an island home, so it only seems fitting to also create an architectural logic puzzle based on a classic conundrum: 

An architect, engineer and contractor are constructing a home on an island. They are not getting along. As happens frequently on construction projects, the engineer is having an affair with the contractor’s wife. To add to the friction, the contractor has stated in no uncertain terms that his two-year old child could draw a better set of plans than the architect (this also happens frequently, but not to us 😉 ).

At the start of the workday, they arrive together at the shore. It’s a low budget project and the only way onto the island is via a small ferry that can hold two people (and one of the two must be the ferryman).

If the contractor and architect are left alone on either the island or the shore, the architect will pummel the contractor.

If the engineer and contractor are left alone, well, let’s just say the engineer will require additional structure for support.

The architect and the engineer, on the other hand, are BFF. They can safely be left alone together.

When the three are together, one of them always intervenes in the others’ dispute, thus avoiding calamity.

So, how can the ferryman bring everyone to the island without incident (alive and unbound), and save himself the extra trip of ferrying a medic across to clean up the mess?

 

Click here for the solution.

Published by

Tim Bjella

Principal architect and interior designer for Arteriors / Bjella Architecture.

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